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Papers, Journal Articles and Book Chapters

"Institutionalizing Disparities in Education: A Case Study of Segregation in Wayne County, NC High Schools," Ann Moss Joyner and Ben Marsh. InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies, 7(1). UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, UC Los Angeles, January, 2011.

"The Effects of Racially and Economically Isolated Schools on Student Performance," Ann Moss Joyner. Poverty and Race, PRRAC, September/October 2010. Vol. 19, No. 5, pp. 11-12.

"The Effects of Racially and Economically Isolated Schools on Student Performance," (Original Full-length paper)

"Institutionalization of Racial Inequality in Local Political Geographies: The Use of GIS evidence." Ben Marsh, Department of Geography, Bucknell University and Allan M. Parnell and Ann Moss Joyner, Cedar Grove Institute for Sustainable Communities, Mebane, North Carolina. Urban Geography, May 31, 2010, pp. 691709. DOI: 10.2747/0272-3638.31.5.691.

Abstract: Municipalities create a local political geography that can institutionalize subordinate positions for minority groups. Most importantly, local governments determine which areas are incorporated into a municipality through annexation and which are excluded. Through these powers, local governments can diminish or deny minority political standing in local affairs, limit access to public services, and reduce the value of minority property. The boundaries are a component of racial residential segregation. Racially disparate application of local governments' power to shape local political geography creates barriers to equality that are difficult to discern on the ground, but which can be made visible by the mapping of spatial data. This study presents four cases where governmental decisions concerning a municipal boundary have institutionalized racial inequality, which is documented with maps created from public GIS data and other public records (e.g., City Council meeting minutes) as well as legal documents. This pattern of systematic exclusion of minority neighborhoods is receiving attention in the legal community, but studies in the social sciences have been limited. [Key words: segregation, municipal boundaries, planning, GIS.]

"(Un)Safe at Home: The Health Consequences of Sub-standard Farm Labor Housing, A Review of the Literature and Call for Research." Don Villarejo, Mark Schenker, Ann Moss Joyner and Allan Parnell. CRLA Rural Justice Forum, December 31, 2009.

"Standards for Extending Extra-Territorial Jurisdiction: Written in Black and White?" Ann Moss Joyner, Carolina Planning, Vol. 32, No. 1, Winter, 2007.

"Minority Exclusion in Small Town America." James H.Johnson Jr., Ann Moss Joyner and Allan M. Parnell, pp. 20-24, Poverty and Race in America: Emerging Agendas, Chester Hartman (ed.) New York: Lexington Books. 2006.

"The Changing Face of Poverty in America." 2006. James H Johnson Jr. and Allan M. Parnell in Battleground: Economics and Business. ML Walden (ed.) Praeger. pp. 405-416.

Abstract: In 2005, Hurricane Katrina's devastation of the City of New Orleans and other Gulf Coast communities refocused the nation's attention on the relationship between race and poverty in America. The people most adversely affected by this catastrophic event were overwhelmingly black, and overwhelmingly poor. A common reaction to the media's dramatic images of disaster victims in New Orleans was: "I didn't think the problem of race and poverty was still with us." As this article shows, the attention to poverty and race brought about by Katrina is yet another phase in the race/poverty discourse in America, which has shifted sharply several times over the past 50 years. Johnson and Parnell show how the face of poverty in the United States has changed over the past 40 years in response to anti-poverty policies and structural changes in the economy.

  • Rural poverty declined while urban poverty grew.
  • Poverty among the elderly and children declined while poverty among working-age adults increased sharply. Today, the working poor account for a higher proportion of Americans in poverty than the jobless poor.
  • Poverty increased in female-headed, single-parent households as the number and proportion of these families grew, especially among African Americans.

Hurricane Katrina served as a vivid reminder that poverty remains a substantial problem in America.

"Minority Exclusion in Small Towns." Johnson, James H., Jr., Ann Moss Joyner and Allan M. Parnell. Poverty & Race 14 March/April 2005.

"Racial Apartheid in a Small North Carolina Town," JH Johnson Jr., Allan M. Parnell, Ann Moss Joyner and Carolyn Christman. The Review of Black Political Economy, Vol. 31, Number 4.

"Challenges to Global Immunization Programs" Ann Moss Joyner. Population Reference Bureau, http://www.prb.org/Articles/2001/ChallengestoGlobalImmunizationPrograms.aspx June, 2001.

"Immunization, Eradication of a Disease," Ann Moss Joyner. Population Reference Bureau, http://www.prb.org/Articles/2001/ChallengestoGlobalImmunizationPrograms.aspx June, 2001.

"Demography and Ethnic Conflict." C. Gray Swicegood, Gillian Stevens and Allan M. Parnell. in J. Gittler (ed.) Disciplinary Perspectives on Racial and Ethnic Conflict. JAI Press (1995).

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Third World Cities: Problems, Policies and Prospects, John D. Kasarda and Allan M. Parnell (eds.), SAGE Publications, Newbury Park, CA 1993.

"Third World Urban Development Issues." John D. Kasarda and Allan M. Parnell. pp. ix-xvii in Third World Cities: Problems, Policies and Prospects, edited with John D. Kasarda, SAGE Publications, Newbury Park, CA 1993.